Sunday, 23 June 2013

International Aviation Organizations











ICAO
The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), is a specialized agency of the United Nations. It codifies the principles and techniques of international air navigation and fosters the planning and development of international air transport to ensure safe and orderly growth. Its headquarters are located in the Quartier International of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
The ICAO Council adopts standards and recommended practices concerning air navigation, its infrastructure, flight inspection, prevention of unlawful interference, and facilitation of border-crossing procedures for international civil aviation. In addition, the ICAO defines the protocols for air accident investigation followed by transport safety authorities in countries signatory to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, commonly known as the Chicago Convention.
As of November 2011, there were 191 ICAO members, consisting of 190 of the 193 UN members.
The ICAO defines an International Standard Atmosphere (also known as ICAO Standard Atmosphere), a model of the standard variation of pressure, temperature, density, and viscosity with altitude in the Earth's atmosphere.It also standardizes certain functions for use in the airline industry, such as the Aeronautical Message Handling System (AMHS), making it a standards organization.

FAA
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is the national aviation authority of the United States of America. An agency of the United States Department of Transportation, it has authority to regulate and oversee all aspects of civil aviation in the U.S. The Federal Aviation Act of 1958 created the organization under the name "Federal Aviation Agency", and adopted its current name in 1966 when it became a part of the United States Department of Transportation.
The FAA's roles include:
Regulating U.S. commercial space transportation.
Regulating air navigation facilities' geometry and flight inspection standards. 
Encouraging and developing civil aeronautics, including new aviation technology.
Issuing, suspending, or revoking Pilot certificates.
Regulating civil aviation to promote safety, especially through local offices called Flight Standards District Offices.
Developing and operating a system of air traffic control and navigation for both civil and military aircraft.
Researching and developing the National Airspace System and civil aeronautics.
Developing and carrying out programs to control aircraft noise and other environmental effects of civil aviation.
The FAA is divided into four "lines of business" (LOB).Each LOB has a specific role within the FAA.
Airports (ARP):-Plans and develops projects involving airports, overseeing their construction and operations. Ensures compliance with federal regulations.
Air Traffic Organization (ATO):-Primary duty is to safely and efficiently move air traffic within the National Airspace System. ATO employees manage air traffic facilities including Airport Traffic Control Towers (ATCT) and Terminal Radar Approach Control Facilities (TRACONs).
Aviation Safety (AVS):-Responsible for aeronautical certification of personnel and aircraft, including Pilots, airlines, and mechanics.
Commercial Space Transportation (AST):-Ensures protection of U.S. assets during the launch or reentry of commercial space vehicles.

JAA
The Joint Aviation Authorities(JAA), was an associated body of the ECAC representing the civil aviation regulatory authorities of a number of European States who had agreed to co-operate in developing and implementing common safety regulatory standards and procedures. It was not a regulatory body, regulation being achieved through the member authorities.
In implementing the so-called FUJA Report, the JAA had entered into a new phase as of 1 January 2007. In this new phase the former "JAA" had become "JAA T" (Transition). JAA T consisted of a Liaison Office (JAA LO) and a Training Office (JAA TO). The offices of JAA LO were located in the premises of European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) in Cologne, Germany.
The JAA started as the Joint Airworthiness Authorities in 1970. Originally, its objectives were only to produce common certification codes for large aeroplanes and for engines in order to meet the needs of European industry and international consortia (e.g., Airbus). After 1987 its work was extended to operations, maintenance, licensing and certification/design standards for all classes of aircraft.

EASA
The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) is a European Union (EU) agency with regulatory and executive tasks in the field of civilian aviation safety. Based in Cologne, Germany, the EASA was created on 15 July 2002,and it reached full functionality in 2008, taking over functions of the Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA). European Free Trade Association (EFTA) countries have been granted participation in the agency.
The responsibilities of EASA include to conduct analysis and research of safety, authorising foreign operators, giving advice for the drafting of EU legislation, implementing and monitoring safety rules (including inspections in the member states), giving type-certification of aircraft and components as well as the approval of organisations involved in the design, manufacture and maintenance of aeronautical products.
The member states are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The Netherlands and The United Kingdom.

ECAC
The European Civil Aviation Conference (ECAC) or Conférence Européenne de l'Aviation Civile (CEAC) is an intergovernmental organization which was established by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the Council of Europe. It is located in Neuilly-sur-Seine/Paris in France. Founded in 1955 with 19 Member States at the time, ECAC counts today 44 members, including all 27 EU, 30 of the 31 European Aviation Safety Agency and all 39 EUROCONTROL Member States.
ECACp romotes the continued development of a safe, efficient and sustainable European air transport system. .
Its strategic priorities are safety, security and the environment.
ECAC Member States are: Albania, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, Ukraine and United Kingdom.


CAA
The CAA has been envisaged as an autonomous regulatory body which will replace the DGCA and will meet standards set by the UN's International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO). The CAA will have separate departments to deal with safety, economic regulation and grievance resolution, as well as a full-fledged environment department. It will also have an independent accident investigation bureau. The Authority will also have the autonomy to recruit staff.
Currently, the DGCA is understaffed and does not have any recruitment powers. The CAA will have administrative and financial powers similar to those of the American FAA. These powers will redefine the regulator's role and better equip it to face the challenges of the growing Aviation sector in the country. Employees working with DGCA will be transferred to the CAA.
The CAA would be self-financing and have a separate fund called the 'Civil Aviation Authority of India Fund' that would finance its entire expenses. It would have a Chairperson, a Director General and 7-9 members appointed by the Central Government. These members will be qualified in the fields of aviation safety, aircraft engineering, flight standard operations, aerodromes, air navigation systems and air space management.

ATAC
ATAC is committed to providing its clients world-class modeling, simulation, and analysis for aviation. With over 30 years of experience in modeling some of the most complex airports, airspace, and aircraft noise challenges, and a product portfolio recognized worldwide for its ability to accurately simulate current and future aviation systems, we invite you to discover how ATAC can help answer your most complex aviation questions.

ATAC has solutions and products available for immediate application for:

Airports
Air Traffic Service Providers
Military Aviation Operations Organizations
Aviation Operations Research Professionals

ATAC's role as the lead software developer and system integrator of the FAA's Integrated Noise Model (INM) supplies in-depth insight into the model's capabilities, limitations, and use. ATAC also has a major role in the development of the Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT), the FAA's next generation environmental modeling software, spanning local and global noise and emissions analyses. ATAC's FAA-funded research are aimed at improving the capabilities of the INM and the AEDT.

IATA
The International Air Transport Association (IATA) is an international industry trade group of airlines headquartered in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, where the International Civil Aviation Organization is also headquartered. The executive offices are at the Geneva Airport in Switzerland.
IATA's mission is to represent, lead, and serve the airline industry. IATA represents some 240 airlines comprising 84% of scheduled international air traffic.The Director General and Chief Executive Officer is Tony Tyler. Currently, IATA is present in over 150 countries covered through 101 offices around the globe.
IATA was formed on 19 April 1945, in Havana, Cuba. It is the successor to the International Air Traffic Association, founded in The Hague in 1919, the year of the world's first international scheduled services.
IATA’s stated mission is to represent, lead and serve the airline industry. All the Airline rules and regulations are defined by IATA. The main aim of IATA is to provide safe and secure transportation to its passengers.
DGCA
The Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) is the Indian  governmental regulatory body for civil aviation under the Ministry of Civil Aviation. This directorate investigates aviation accidents and incidents. It is headquartered along Sri Aurobindo Marg, opposite Safdarjung Airport, in New Delhi. The Government of India is planning to replace the Organisation with a Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), modelled on the lines of the American Federal Aviation Administration DGCA has fourteen Regional Airworthiness Offices (RAO) at Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Cochin, Bhopal, Lucknow, Patna, Bhubaneshwar, Kanpur, Guwahati and Patiala. It has also five Regional Air Safety offices located at Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata and Hyderabad. It has a Regional Research and Development Office located at Bangalore and a Gliding Centre at Pune.



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